='data:blog.isMobile ? "width=device-width,initial-scale=1.0,minimum-scale=1.0,maximum-scale=1.0" : "width=1100"' name='viewport'/> The Crawford Arts Review: James Rosenquist until Saturday 09 November

Thursday, 3 October 2019

James Rosenquist until Saturday 09 November

GALERIE THADDAEUS ROPAC  LONDON  -  at Ely House and at frieze LONDON

First, Ely House: James Rosenquist, "Visualising the Sixties": Can one begin to call the 1960s an age of innocence? Compared to now, that is? Well, the work of James Rosenquist will allow you, non-nostalgically, to revisit it. 

In the US, the sixties was a decade that Rosenquist made his own, becoming as influential as any artist of his time. His works are full of innovation in terms of materials, techniques and subject matter. Mylar, the acetate of the time, was painted and precision cut to make what he called Immersive paintings; collages incorporated everything from torch lights to fishing hooks. No wonder other artists of the time revered him.

Rosenquist was also an entry player in the field of kinetics. The picture shows his painting Tube (1961).

Paint applied to canvas seems to spin before your eyes. But step back a moment and look sideways on (see image below).










Here the painting resembles a speed dial. I venture to say that here the artist is demonstrating the consummate skill of the commercial 'billboard' artist he once was. In the scaling up of poster art, the image must have enough impact to arrest the attention of the speeding walker or driver.








There is something fragile and somehow innocent about so much of the work we see here, whether painting or preparatory sketch. The artist is able to get his effects using a subtle but convincing graphic language that is never brash, but nevertheless wholly convincing. 


What a nice man he must have been you think as you pass the giant photograph of him at work that adorns the Gallery's entrance hall.











FRIEZE LONDON HIGHLIGHTS GALERIE THADDAEUS ROPAC

Coloured minimalism, Rosemarie Castoro (red pink green grey blue tan, 1964), maximalism, Elizabeth Peyton, (Kiss, 2019), and between these poles, the sculptural Oliver Beer (Recomposition (Troy), 2019)  a violin sectioned and set in resin.



FRIEZE LONDON LIVE GALERIE THADDAEUS ROPAC
A co-production of a series of Oskar Schlemmer's original Bauhaus Dance performances as part of Frieze LIVE's focus on the Bauhaus, and coinciding with Bauhaus 100, its 100th Anniversary. Performances take place on 2nd, 3rd & 5th October at 4pm in the performance area close to the Ropac booth (Stand B7).

GALERIE THADDAEUS ROPAC
ELY HOUSE
37 DOVER STREET
LONDON W1
info@ropac.net

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